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Concert Review: Davy Jones

August 19, 2008
Club Regent Casino
Winnipeg, MB Canada

Though he’s grown a few wrinkles over the years, former teenage heartthrob Davy Jones certainly hasn’t grown any taller than he was back in his heyday with the Monkees.

The diminutive Jones started as a song and dance man when he when first came to North American as the Artful Dodger in a Toronto based production of the musical Oliver, and it seems that he’s come full circle. His nearly 2 hour show at the Club Regent was an entertaining potpourri of songs, jokes, and anecdotes from his wildly popular NBC music comedy – the Monkees.

But the Jones’ presentation seemed totally in line with the Monkees’ show format – a zany, gag filled romp about a fictional rock n’ roll band that incidentally included a few songs from the band along the way.

As Davy himself joked, “the songs w e did back in the sixties were only a minute and 12 seconds long, I have to fill the time with something!”

Judging from the adoring crowd reaction, Davy could easily have spun yarns and told jokes for the entire show, but thankfully he did get around to performing many of his famous Monkees hits.

The former BBC Coronation Street star opened the set with the Monkees’ 1966 Neil Diamond penned No 1 I’m a Believer (the song from the movie Shrek for the youngsters in the crowd). Mickey Dolenz originally sang the lead vocals, but it was interesting to note that Davy’s voice suited the song very well, and it could just as easily have been his voice that scored with the original hit.

He had a tight 6 piece band with a real brass section as opposed to the synthesized variety who did a solid job both instrumentally and vocally.

The Daydream Believer hitmaker then gave a doff of the wool hat to fellow Monkee Michael Nesmith, performing the Nesmith penned Papa Gene’s Blues from the 1966 Monkees’ debut album.

Next came a punched up version of another fine Neil Diamond composition Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow from the Monkees 1966 album More of the Monkees, followed by another Nesmith penned track from the same album, Mary Mary.

A consummate showman, the 64-year-old Jones did an excellent job of engaging the audience, cracking many self-deprecating jokes about his height, age, kids, and his career ups and downs. He shook hands with many of the fans in the front row told and told an interesting anecdote about appearing on Ed Sullivan the day on the same bill as the Beatles first North American TV appearance and then treated the fans to the song Consider Yourself from the soundtrack of Oliver, the piece Jones had performed on Ed Sullivan on that historic evening.

The former horse jockey also pulled out some interesting jazz swing numbers such as Louis Jordan’s Is You Is, or Is You Ain’t My Baby that he dedicated to the memory of his parents.

But of course, the fans came mostly to see Davy perform his Monkees’ hits and Davy did not disappoint. Crowd favourites were 1967’s Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones’ – She Hangs Out which featured Davy doing his famous dance (famously stolen by Guns N’ Roses singer Axl Rose), 1967’s Monkee’s smash hit A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You, as well as the 1968 Boyce and Hart penned Monkees’ hit single Valleri.

Of course, the biggest highlight was The Birds, The Bees and The Monkees 1968 chart topper Daydream Believer which the ex-Monkee used to wrap up the set, followed by a reprised I’m A Believer for his well-deserved encore.

Davy Jone certainly made “believers” out the crowd as they filed out, eyes shining, having spent the evening reminiscing to the soundtrack of their youth.

 

Come On, Let’s Go on a Motorcycle Ride

Hello, just call me Fat Cat. I have been riding my motorcycle for 2 years now and have greatly enjoyed the freedom and thrill that comes with it. In the 2 years I have been riding, I experienced the good and the bad sides of riding. I have almost wrecked once, almost been run over by several 4 wheeled motorists, but most importantly I have experienced the awe of natural and man-made landmarks in a way that you can’t experience them in a car. I would like to share these experiences in future articles with my fellow motorcycle riders and people who have not, for whatever reason, had the chance to enjoy the open roads on a motorcycle.

Throughout the year of 2012 I will be participating in several motorcycle poker runs. During these trips I will be taking photographs, notes, and interviewing people. I hope to share these experiences and encourage others to join in these good causes. My interviews will vary from interesting bikes and their riders to the organizers of the ride. My photos will consist of riders, bikes, and landscaping throughout the ride. I hope to show people that do not understand riding motorcycles, the freedom and good heartedness of riders and maybe encourage more people to at least try and experience motorcycle riding.

For those of you who don’t know, a motorcycle poker run is a motorcycle ride with a starting point and ending point. In between the start and ending points there are scheduled stops in which you will draw a playing card. At the ending point you will draw your last card and this will be your poker hand. There are different variations of poker runs, but this explanation should give you some idea of what to expect.

I will also be chronicling my personal rides and the rides that my buddies and I take just to relax. As much as I enjoy riding in motorcycle poker runs I also enjoy riding by myself and/or with just a few people. With just a few riders your opportunities to stop at a “hole-in-the-wall” restaurant or to take that interesting looking narrow road safely are much more enjoyable because you are on your own schedule. When you ride in a motorcycle poker run you are riding with a large group of people which is scheduled to run within an approximate time frame so sometimes you can feel rushed.

Generally, motorcycle poker runs are for charities of varying causes. Myself, I will not ride in a poker run that is not for, in my opinion, a good cause. In other words, if someone organized a poker run for a political faction you can bet I will not be there, but if it is for needy children and I am able I will be there. It is up to you to choose what you think is a worthy cause or sometimes you may go on a charity ride simply because a bunch of your friends do. Not only do I consider the charity, but I also consider the area where the charity motorcycle poker run will begin and/or end. I like checking out new rides for different sites to see and also for different areas for me to ride on my own or with my buddies.

I always fill up my gas tank and then clean my motorcycle the night before a poker run whether it needs it or not. Personally, I am embarrassed for someone to see my motorcycle dirty especially at any type of motorcycle or automobile function. Filling the gas tank up before I go on a poker run allows me to enjoy the ride and comradery without having to waste time during the ride to fill up. Every poker run I have been on I have had enough gas to complete the ride and return home.

Now, that you may have an idea of what a poker run is find one and ride!

Cincinnati Metro “Mini” Hybrid Buses: Green Travel To Local Fun Destinations

Residents living near Cincinnati, Ohio’s entertainment destinations, may have noticed prettier, shorter buses passing by. Those colorful buses are “mini” Hybrids which operate using both diesel fuel and electrical power. The use of Hybrid technology shows Cincinnati Metro’s ongoing commitment to Green transportation. The colorful images covering the buses from top to bottom illustrate their dedication to fun.

These recent additions to the city’s growing Hybrid fleet hit the streets in December 2010. The non profit Southwestern Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) purchased the new Hybrid buses with 100% funding from federal stimulus dollars. The “mini” Hybrid buses are part of Metro’s new Route #1 service that connects parks, museums and the arts with the people who enjoy them.

Route #1 “The One For Fun “

The remapped Metro Route #1 encourages local fun seekers to make the Green transportation choice of bus ridership over vehicle use. For an economical fare, a rider can take low emission Hybrid transportation to the city’s key entertainment districts. The colorful “mini” Hybrids wind a path through Downtown, Mount Adams and along the Riverfront. They make stops at 43 arts, entertainment and historic venues and other points of interest along the way.

Route #1 riders have easy access to the Museum Center, Cincinnati Art Museum, Paul Brown Stadium, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, the Zoo and more. They can save gas, prevent auto emissions. With no car to deal with, riders need not be concerned with traffic and parking.

The #1 bus now departs every 30 minutes. To further elevate its profile as reliable mass transportation to the city’s fun destinations, the route name has been changed. It was originally Route #1 Zoo-Museum Center. Now it’s “#1 The One For Fun.”

Hollywood Casino Sponsor of “The One for Fun”

Metro’s Route #1 Hybrid “mini” buses encourage everyone to get out, see the city and have fun. Hollywood Casino, an entertainment complex in nearby Lawrenceburg, Indiana, has stepped into a sponsorship role to help accomplish that goal. Their Metro partnership is coordinated by the local firm, Advertising Vehicles. Hollywood’s support for “The One For Fun” helped transform the buses into traveling works of art that market Cincinnati’s entertainment venues.

The “Mini” Hybrid buses are all decked out from top to bottom in flowers, butterflies, zoo wildlife and other colorful scenes. Each bus is branded, “The One For Fun.” Colorful ads market Hollywood Casino and local attractions found along the route.

Fun With Hybrid Benefits

The Green benefits of mass transit are clear. It helps get cars off the road. Reduced auto traffic lowers carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Hybrid buses take the Green benefit one step further. On board systems, including “regenerative braking,” produce electrical power and reduce reliance on diesel gas.

Each “Mini” Hybrid bus is 30 feet long. The smaller size further reduces gas consumption compared to full size Hybrid buses that average 10 feet greater in length. The overall “mini” Hybrid result is efficient transportation, less fuel usage, fewer emissions and lots of fun.

The Top Robot Vacuum Cleaner Models To Get For Your Home

There are lots of vacuum cleaner models available to purchase this 2019, like the recensione dyson v10 model. However, for people looking for a smart vacuum cleaner with a great AI, this article is for you.

A few robot vacuum cleaner models are more suitable for specific assignments and areas compared to other models, and selecting the correct one will help you save you the trouble of needing to go through the same portion of your carpet many times. There is a lot of factors to take into account, so we have listed the factors you must consider when choosing a robot vacuum cleaner for your room or house. Without further ado, let’s start:

  1. Eufy RoboVac 11S

Priced at just 220 dollars, this vacuum cleaner is considerably less expensive when compared with almost every other robot vacuum cleaner we examined, however, it is actually just as proficient when it comes to vacuum cleaning.

You do not have to spend a fortune to purchase an AI vacuum cleaner that will clean your home automatically with this budget friendly product. This model has a more compact shape best suited in tight areas, a rather lengthier runtime, as well as enhanced functions.

  1. Deebot 711

The Ecovacs family of vacuums has long been a shopper and Business Insider favorite. Ecovacs features a few of the best-selling robot vacuum cleaners online. It has almost a couple of hours of run time while on battery that makes it a great choice for even the most dusty floor surfaces.

What is more impressive with the Deebot 711 model is its mapping capabilities, with its Smart Navi Mapping Technology. This innovation allows it to remember which area of your home is the dirtiest so that it can focus on that particular area.